• 0

LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION

 

London College of Fashion is in Top 25 Fashion Schools in the World. We put together all the necessary documentation for applying to a Fashion Undergraduate and Postgraduate London College of Fashion course below.

BA (HONS) FASHION DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: WOMENSWEAR

 

BA (Hons) Fashion Design Technology: Womenswear will develop the core skills of researching, designing, pattern cutting and realisation of womenswear, including problem solving, to achieve the finished product.

As well as learning these skills you will gain an intellectual appreciation of fashion and its place in society through studying relevant academic units, and acquire the visual and verbal skills necessary to be a successful designer. The course considers market levels, from high street to designer, through a range of projects, many of which are in conjunction with specific labels or companies, or are for a particular sector of the market. The course takes advantage of its global positioning in one of the fashion capitals of the world, and you will have the opportunity to interact with the city’s thriving fashion, art, music and club cultures.

The short work placement will enable you to experience the reality of working within a particular company, together with the chance to make useful contacts for your future career. This wider involvement with industry and society is invaluable to your development as a designer, as is the opportunity to enter national and international design competitions and to take part in collaborations across the College on specific external projects. You will be encouraged through the course to develop your individual identity through your work, by a fusion of your design direction and the excellent craft skills and knowledge of technological developments that you have acquired. You will understand every aspect of a garment through both the creative detail in the design and the technical skills used in production. By the end of this course you will be equipped with the knowledge and confidence to respond creatively to a design brief within the womenswear market. Graduates are working in high level jobs in the industry, or working as designers with their own label, or pursuing their studies at postgraduate level.

Course structure
Year one – stage one – level 4 – 120 credits

Term one
Introduction to Fashion Design Technology – Womenswear (20 credits)
Research and Design Process (20 credits)

Term two
Introduction to Cultural and Historical Studies (20 credits)
Techniques of Making (20 credits)

Term three
Introduction to Industry Practice (40 credits)

Year two – stage two – level 5 – 120 credits

Term one
Cultural and Historical Studies Option (20 credits)
Professional Product Development (20 credits)

Term two (or Three)
Research Methods (20 credits)
Aesthetics and Identity (20 credits)

Term three (or Two)
Work Experience and Professional Studies (40 credits)

Third year – stage three – level 6 – 120 credits

Term one
Design Synthesis (40 credits)

Terms one, two and three
Contextualising Your Practice (20 credits)

Terms two and three
Final Major Project (60 credits)

Students on this course might be invited to participate in study trips. This may involve, for example, visits to key areas of capital cities, factories, stores and museums. Attendance on these trips is not compulsory but recommended. Details regarding timings and costs will be issued closer to the relevant trips.

Year one
In the first term you will study two units.

Introduction to Fashion Design Technology Womenswear aims to introduce you to your course and its subject specialism as well as to effective learning and studentship at undergraduate level. It will orientate you to the practices and knowledge-base needed to understand your discipline and help you to develop your skills for independent & collaborative learning, reflection and your own self development. Students come from many diverse educational backgrounds and a part of this unit will enable to reflect on your own background and how that shapes the way you approach your course.

The Research and Design Process unit introduces you to research methods and their relevance and application to the design process and the realisation of ideas. The focus is on the importance of research that always informs design and its 3D development, and explores this relationship. Visual communication and an exploration of techniques will be encouraged and you will be introduced to ways of recording your work in a stimulating, exciting and informative way using a variety of communication methods and media. You will develop creative ideas that relate to and expand your visual references, and you will be introduced through demonstration to the core practical 3D skills of pattern cutting and manufacturing techniques. You will start to learn about fabrics and sourcing fabrics, and will be encouraged to produce creative samples.

In the second term you will study two units.

Introduction to Cultural and Historical Studies introduces you to key concepts and ways of thinking about fashion and its context in society and culture. You will attend lectures, seminars and workshops, and do a significant amount of reading of academic texts in order to complete a formal academic essay for assessment. Completion of this unit will allow you to make an informed choice of subject for study in the second year Cultural and Historical Studies unit.

Techniques of Making introduces you to the diversity and characteristics of different stretch and woven fabrics and the differences between structured and unstructured garments. This analysis will inform manufacturing techniques and finishes that will influence the translation of ideas within the 2D and 3D design process. The emphasis will be on the creative use of specialist techniques to create contemporary design development ideas. Use of fabric, colour, detail and technical processes will all be considered in your response to the project brief. Technical drawing and the use of IT programmes for design communication and presentation will also be explored.

In the third term you will collaborate with fellow students in a small group to respond to a simulated or live industry brief through the Introduction to Industry Practice unit. You will be introduced to the essential concepts of brand identity, market levels, customer profile, pricing and range building. Each team will identify the strengths of each member of the team, and together you will develop your networking, communication, team-work and presentation skills in order to answer the brief. The emphasis in this unit is on the exploration and analysis of information and creative problem solving in a team through discussion and negotiation. You will use professional production and presentation skills in your response to the industrial brief.

Year two
In the first term you will be able to study a Cultural and Historical Studies Option of your choice that will broaden or deepen your learning of areas relating to your interests in your chosen field. You will have the opportunity to participate in lectures, seminars and workshops with students from other courses within your School, and will read relevant academic texts and complete a formal academic essay for assessment.

Also in the first term, the Professional Product Development unit will further develop your research, analysis and design development skills, as well as increasing your fabric knowledge, sourcing and technical skills. You will be asked to explore the principles of tailoring and outerwear garments. You will develop your 2D and 3D skills, through working with tailoring fabrics and the innovative use of techniques, manufacture and finishes, to create contemporary design proposals. Colour, fabric, proportion, silhouette and detail will all be considered, and you will employ appropriate drawing techniques and software packages to clearly communicate your design ideas.

In the second term the Research Methods unit provides a broad overview of the different critical and methodological approaches to research and introduces you to a range of research methods. You will learn more about the role of research in design and technology, the relationship between primary and secondary sources, and ways of developing and originating research. This will prepare you for later projects where considerable research skills are needed to underpin your work.

Also in the second term the Aesthetics and Identity unit consolidates your learning to date and allows you to consider in depth your personal design aesthetic and where your particular direction lies. Your increasing knowledge of research methods will underpin your response to the project brief and you will consider the client, market and product in depth. You will produce a range of products that demonstrate a deep understanding of research, analysis, design development, experimentation and manufacture. Your understanding of marketing and product knowledge, together with your critical awareness of the quality of your design proposal, will be developed through this unit.

In the third term the Placement and Professional Studies unit gives you the opportunity to further develop your skills learnt on the course and apply them within a professional working environment. You will experience real industry problems and working practice and will be able to look at the ways in which the professional team members operate. You will be able to judge what opportunities exist for your career progression. You will be expected to take an analytical and reflective approach to the placement and you will produce visual and written material that documents your increased understanding of your experience. LCF Careers will run a preparatory programme before your placement, and you will be expected to be involved in securing a suitable placement for your own personal development, skill set and career aspirations.

The projects in Term Two and Term Three are interchangeable to ensure that students achieve a successful placement in industry. Recent placements have included Marc Jacobs, Givenchy, Margiela, Alexander Wang, Iris van Herpen, Donna Karan, Meadham Kirchoff, Proenza Schouler, Maison Martin Margiela, Hussein Chalayan and Louise Gray.

Year three
In the first term you will do the Design Synthesis unit which inform and prepare you for your Final Major Project. You will be expected to negotiate a project brief that will allow a full investigation into an exploratory research and practical journey towards a body of work showing innovative design and technical experimentation with material, process and potential garment solutions in 2D and 3D form. The focus is on using your skills to show extensive creative experimentation, whilst considering the practical aspects of problem-solving, through fabric and trims sourcing, appropriate use of finish and detailing alongside silhouette/shape development. You will identify your proposed market level and customer, and produce a Statement of Intent which identifies your brand ethos and core philosophy as a designer. The completed outfits will form the basis of your collection for your Final Major Project.

Contextualising Your Practice in the first and second term affords you the opportunity to demonstrate your understanding of the critical and analytical perspectives developed within cultural and historical theory and your ability to apply these in a specific study. You will research the topic you identified in the Research Methods unit, which will lead to the production of an extended essay. It is the opportunity for you to undertake a substantial piece of structured research that examines in depth practical and theoretical issues related to your field of practice; it will build on the critical debates and concerns raised throughout your course.

In terms two and three you will undertake your Final Major Project. This is the culmination of your undergraduate experience and gives you the opportunity to fully develop the work started in the Design Synthesis unit to produce a body of work that reflects a deep engagement with the exploration and development of your design ideas through to your final design collection. Your work should evidence your ability to construct, direct and organise an overall professional outcome, which will launch you into the next stage of your career.

Home / EU applicants

Applications are now open for 2018/19 entry.

You must apply through Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS), where you’ll need the following information:

University code: U65
UCAS code: W291

Please note that the equal consideration deadline is 15 January.

For full details on the application process, visit the Undergraduate application link.

Entry to this degree course is highly competitive. Selection is determined by the quality of the application, indicated primarily in your portfolio and written statement. Applicants are expected to have achieved, or be expected to achieve, the course entry requirements details below:

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design
1 GCE A Level
3 GCSEs grade C or above
OR

Pass at BTEC Extended Diploma
3 GCSEs grade C or above
OR

Other University of Arts London awarded level 3 Pre-University Diploma and Extended Diploma in Art and Design
4 GCSEs grade C or above
OR

Pass at Foundation Diploma in Art and Design (Lever 3 or 4)
International Baccalaureate Diploma pass achieved at 28 points or above
OR

Pass at Foundation Diploma in Art and Design (Lever 3 or 4)
An equivalent high school qualification from an EU or non-EU institution
Applicants who do not meet these course entry requirements may still be considered if the course team judges the application demonstrates additional strengths and alternative evidence. This might be demonstrated by, for example: related academic or work experience; the quality of the personal statement; a strong academic or other professional reference; or a combination of these factors.

English language requirements
All classes are conducted in English. If English is not your first language you will be asked to provide evidence of your English language ability in order to apply for a visa, enrol, and start your course. The English language requirement for entry for this course is:

IELTS Academic 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each of the 4 skills (on one single test)

For further information visit the English Language requirements page.

Applicants who will need a Tier 4 General Student Visa should check the Visa and Immigration page which provides important information about UK Visa and Immigration (UKVI) requirements.

Entry to this course is highly competitive: applicants are expected to achieve, or already have, the course entry requirements detailed below.

The standard minimum entry requirements for this course are:

Two A Level Passes at Grade C or above; preferred subjects include, Art, Design, English, Maths;
or a Pass Foundation Diploma in Art and Design;
or Merit, Pass, Pass at BTEC Extended Diploma in Art & Design;
or Pass at UAL Extended Diploma;
or an Access Diploma or ’64 tariff points from the Access to HE Diploma;
or 64 new UCAS tariff points (equivalent to 160 old UCAS tariff points) from a combination of the above qualifications or an equivalent full Level 3 qualification;
or equivalent EU or non-EU qualifications’;
And three GCSE passes at grade A*-C.
Exceptionally, applicants who do not meet these course entry requirements may still be considered if the course team judges the application demonstrates additional strengths and alternative evidence. This might, for example, be demonstrated by: related academic or work experience; the quality of the personal statement; a strong academic or other professional reference; or a combination of these factors.

This course requires portfolio evidence.

English language requirements
All classes are conducted in English. If English is not your first language you will be asked to provide evidence of your English language ability when you enrol.

The level required by the University for this course is IELTS 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each skill. Please visit the UAL Language Requirements page. Read carefully and look at the relevant documents.

Student selection criteria
What we look for

The course team seeks to recruit students who can demonstrate:

A strong interest in fashion, visual imagery and an awareness of technology
An understanding of the need for a critical and analytical approach to the area of study
An approach suited to the demands of the course and the projected career futures
This might, for example, be demonstrated by: related academic or work experience; the quality of the personal statement, a strong academic or other professional reference; or a combination of these factors.

Portfolio and interview advice
For this course you will be required to upload a mini portfolio. Further instructions will be sent by the course administrator after application submission. International students should contact the Admissions Office at lcf.international@arts.ac.uk to find out about the portfolio application process.

For this course your portfolio should show evidence of: drawing/presentation skills; contemporary fashion/cultural awareness; a level of research, exploration and experimentation; fabric and material selection/knowledge; construction/technical competence; ability to think/work in 3D; and visual communication skills.

Applicants will be expected to demonstrate the following at interview: a strong interest in fashion and visual imagery; an awareness of technology; a critical and analytical approach; a motivation to succeed on the course; and a motivation for working as a womenswear designer.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT
All application forms, personal statements and references are read and considered by the course team against the selection criteria listed in the Entry requirements and What we look for sections.

Depending on the quality of your application, you may be asked to submit a number of images of your work. If the course team wish to consider your application further, you will be invited to an interview where the course team will look at your portfolio and ask you questions to establish your suitability for the course. If you are successful at the interview stage you will be offered a place. Applicants are not guaranteed to be asked to upload work, nor are they guaranteed an interview.
Please note that if you are unable to attend the College may not be able to re-schedule.

If you applied through UCAS the result of your application will be communicated to you via UCAS through ucastrack. You will only receive further communication directly from the College if your application has been successful. This will be in the form of a full offer pack including details of accommodation, fees, and other important information.

Deferred entry
Deferred entry is normally only allowed in exceptional circumstances. Please contact us before you submit your application if you are considering applying for deferred entry.

Interview week
Applicants on some courses may be invited to attend an Interview. Further details will be sent to you with your interview letter, confirming location and date. International applicants should contact the Admission Office by emailing lcf.international@arts.ac.uk about portfolio requirements (if applicable), interview times and dates.

Potential changes to course structure
Please note: the information outlined is an indicative structure of the course. Whilst we will aim to deliver the course as described on this page, there may be situations where it is desirable or necessary for the University to make changes in course provision, for example because of regulatory requirements or operational efficiencies, before or after enrolment. If this occurs, we will communicate all major changes to all applicants and students who have either applied or enrolled on the course. Please note that due to staff research agreements or availability, not all of the optional modules listed may be available every year. In addition, the provision of course options which depend upon the availability of specialist teaching, or on a placement at another institution, cannot be guaranteed. Please check this element of the course with the course team before making a decision to apply.

Home / EU fee
£9,250

This applies for the 2018/19 academic year.

Tuition fees for undergraduate degree courses have been set at £9,250 per year for full-time study. This applies from the 2017/18 academic year, subject to changes in the law. Tuition fees may increase in future years for new and continuing students, in line with an inflationary amount determined by government. Please visit our Undergraduate tuition fees page for more information.

International fee
£19,350

This applies for the 2018/19 academic year.

Additional costs
In addition to tuition fees you are very likely to incur additional costs such as travel expenses and the cost of materials. Please read the information on our additional costs link.

Developing your skills
All of our undergraduate courses are concerned with the development of your personal and professional skills. On your course you will evolve from learning basic skills in your discipline through to a position where you are an independent creative thinker capable of making an effective contribution to the relevant sector of the fashion industry. Personal and Professional Development (PPD) skills are embedded in all units on every course. Speaker programmes with contributions from alumni, members of industry and others are a part of many courses, as are work placement opportunities in industry.

Graduates who wish to continue their education at postgraduate level are encouraged to progress to suitable courses within the College, the University or elsewhere.

Career paths
Many graduates prefer to seek employment as soon as they have completed their undergraduate studies. Recent Womenswear graduates from this course are working in many companies across the industry including Max Mara, Celine, Hillier Bartley,Tom Ford, Alexander McQueen, Tesco, Arcadia, Debenhams, Jaeger, All Saints and Burberry. Other graduates have gone on to set up and operate their own labels, showing their collections independently, being selected for Fashion East, or producing guest collections for H&M.

MA FASHION DESIGN TECHNOLOGY WOMENSWEAR

Based mainly in central London, at John Prince’s Street, and resourced by specialist equipment at our other sites, contemporary technology is at the core of this course.

CAD CAM, state of the art knitting machines and facilities for digital print, rapid proto-typing and laser cutting allow students to produce womenswear collections that innovate in the field.

By nurturing creativity and specialist research, the course enables individuals to produce high quality and innovative work through illustration, design, cutting and modern manufacturing.

Students are supported to develop collaborations with industry specialists and international fabric suppliers, a process that not only builds important contacts for the future but one that enriches student experience and refines design sensibility. Using diverse production techniques – from couture craftsmanship to futuristic experimentation – students are able to explore their own perspectives to form the basis of their MA collection. Guided by experienced staff, this also has the potential to incorporate a further specialism such as embroidery, knitwear or digital concepts.

Course structure
15 months, 4 terms, level 7, 180 credits

Term one

Creative and Technical Innovation (40 credits)

Research Methods (20 credits)

Term two

Technical Analysis and Development (40 units)

Collaborative Unit (20 credits) – find out more

Terms three and four

Masters Project (60 credits)

Travelling across London
The renowned London College of Fashion library is at our John Prince’s Street site, and you will need to travel to this site, and possibly others, during your course to use the library, which is open seven days a week in term time, and for tuition and special events.

Course structure
The information outlined is an indicative structure of the course. Whilst we will aim to deliver the course as described on this page, there may be situations where it is desirable or necessary for the University to make changes in course provision, for example because of regulatory requirements or operational efficiencies, before or after enrolment. If this occurs, we will communicate all major changes to all applicants and students who have either applied or enrolled on the course.

Please note that due to staff research agreements or availability, not all of the optional modules listed may be available every year.

In addition, the provision of course options which depend upon the availability of specialist teaching, or on a placement at another institution, cannot be guaranteed. Please check this element of the course with the course team before making a decision to apply.

Webpage updates
We will update this webpage from time to time with new information as it becomes available. In the meantime, if you have any questions, please contact a member of the course team.

Enquire about this course
Haven’t found the information you’re looking for? Want to ask us a question about this course?

Enquire

Course dates
Autumn term:

Monday 10 September – Friday 30 November 2018

Spring term:

Monday 7 January – Friday 15 March 2019

Summer term:

Monday 15 April – Friday 5 July 2019

Autumn term:

Monday 16 September – Friday 29 November 2019

COURSE UNITS
The Creative and Technical Innovation unit is designed to establish and develop a balance to creative thinking and expand on your practical level of skills. Work will develop individually in response to the particular workshop sessions and introductions of supporting facilities and equipment available.

You will evaluate and expand your technical and practical skills in relevant methodologies pertinent to the technological and/or craft based skills you have appropriated.

Through tutorial guidance and peer review you will explore alternatives and possibilities to strengthen and expand your initial ideas into a revised proposal for presentation and development in the next stage of the MA.

The purpose of the Research Methods unit is to introduce you to the range of research methods, approaches and tools that are available to you in order to conduct your post graduate project.

The unit will cover philosophy and ethics in research; primary and secondary research methods, including quantitative, qualitative and visual research methods; and how to analyse, evaluate and disseminate research findings.

The unit will consider research in a range of contexts relevant to the cultural and creative industries and enable you to understand the relationship between theory and practice.

The Technical Analysis and Development unit is designed to support the planning and development of your Masters Project. In order for you to achieve a coherent and original body of work by the end of the course, this unit concentrates on the further development of your studio practice and the evaluation, which is underpinned by sound research.

Analysis within the previous specialist units of your MA course will inform you of ways to consult and develop a wide range of specialist resources and methodologies.

You are required to develop and scope your critical practice, to analytically review, and revise your focus in line with your expanding theories and in the context of your proposed market. The process of development and review culminates in an oral presentation and written proposal for assessment.

This Collaborative Unit is designed to enable you to innovate, engage in developmental processes and participate in collaborative working practices. You will be encouraged to develop the professional negotiating and networking skills that you will need in order to be successful in the cultural and creative industries.

The nature of this collaboration may be within your own course, with students on other courses or with industry. The project that you undertake will depend upon your discipline and the specific requirements of your course. Further details will be available in your unit handbook.

The Masters Project is an important piece of work which will provide an opportunity for you to demonstrate your knowledge and skills in relation to your discipline and chosen project. Throughout the Masters Project, you are guided and supported by tutorials and peer and staff evaluation at interim stages.

You will be allocated a supervisor for your project and will complete a learning contract outlining how you intend to develop and deliver your project. The Masters Project may take a variety of forms by negotiation and is assessed by presentation in an agreed format.

You will need to enter the following information in the online application form:

Personal details (including full name; date of birth; nationality; permanent address and English language level)
Current and/or previous education and qualification details
Employment history
Before you can submit the form, you’ll also need to agree to the terms and conditions for how we process your data – these are explained in the form.

Please note, if you’re an international applicant we will need to contact you separately to ask for copies of certain documents (for example, English language qualification/certificate and copies of any previous UK study visas).

Extra information required for applications to this course
When you are submitting your application form, you will also need to provide the following pieces of documentation in support of your application:

Curriculum vitae
You will be required to submit a Curriculum Vitae (C.V.) in support of your application. This should include your full education and employment history.

Personal statement
The personal statement is your opportunity to tell us about yourself and your suitability for the course that you intend to study.

Some key points to consider:

Make sure that personal statement is your own work and is about you.
Explain why you want to study the course you are applying to.
Try to link your skills and experience required to the course.
Demonstrate your interest and enthusiasm for the course and link these with your personality.
Make sure it is organised and literate (grammar, spelling, punctuation check).
Study proposal
Your study proposal should be no more than 600 words (excluding research sources, bibliography and appendices).

It should:

state briefly the background for the proposal;
determine the precise area of study;
set out clearly and concisely your aims and objectives for the period of study within the course structure;
refer to critical ideas that may underpin your practice;
State the form of realisation/ outcome of the study proposal.
Your Study Proposal should have the following structure:

Introduction

Introduce your work. Briefly outline recent developments prior to application. Describe the anticipated programme of study in detail, demonstrating your knowledge of the historical and contemporary context of your area of study. Focus on specific areas or issues that underpin and frame the proposal.

Programme of study

Outline the sequence of practical, theoretical and research that you intend to follow. This will be vital to your programme of study in the development stage in which the Study Proposal will progress and take shape. For example, describe in detail the methodologies that you follow and their significance for the design process. (Advice and support will be offered by tutors on the course). Any supporting material should appear in the Appendices at the end of the proposal.

Evaluation

Evaluate your work to date. Draw any conclusions you are able to make.

Research sources

Give details of libraries, exhibitions, museums, galleries and special archives that you have visited as part of your research towards the proposal.

Bibliography

Keep a full record of all original and documentary material consulted. List appropriate material using the Harvard Referencing System.

Appendices

Insert any additional material that you consider relevant but not part of the core of the study proposal. This could include links to notes, drawings and additional research material.

Portfolio
You will be required to submit a digital portfolio with a maximum of 30 images that you consider would help support your application. Submit your portfolio via the university’s digital portfolio tool, PebblePad. More details will be sent to you after you have submitted your application. You should include essential development work from sketchbooks to portfolio final presentations with photography of garments. Label and present any visual work with care, including dates and captions. If selected for interview, you will be asked to bring garments with you and additional portfolio work.

This course is highly competitive, selection is determined by the quality of your application, indicated primarily in your portfolio and written work.

An applicant will only be considered for admission who has already achieved an educational level equivalent to a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours Degree in Fashion Design, Knitwear or Printed Textiles with a strong fashion bias.

This educational level may be demonstrated by:

Possession of the qualifications named above;
Possession of professional qualifications recognised as equivalent to an Honours Degree;
Prior experiential learning, the outcome of which can be demonstrated to be equivalent to the formal qualifications otherwise required, or;
A combination of formal qualifications and experiential learning which, taken together, can be demonstrated to be equivalent to the formal qualifications otherwise required.
English language requirements
All classes are conducted in English. If English is not your first language you will be asked to provide evidence of your English language ability in order to apply for a visa, enrol, and start your course. The English language requirement for entry for this course is:

IELTS Academic 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each of the 4 skills (on one single test).

For further information visit the English Language requirements link.

Entry to this course is highly competitive: applicants are expected to achieve, or already have, the course entry requirements detailed below.

An Honours degree at 2.1 or above in a related discipline. Applicants with a degree in another subject may be considered, depending on the strength of the application;
OR

Equivalent qualifications;
OR

Relevant and quantitative industrial experience for a minimum of three years.
Selection for interview will be made on the basis of your application, including the personal statement, examples of your design work, the supporting written assignment and project proposal. If you are selected for interview you will be asked to bring a portfolio of previous work, including developmental work where possible, and two womenswear garments you have made to evidence your skills

For this course your digital portfolio should show evidence of: drawing/presentation skills; contemporary fashion/cultural awareness; a level of research, exploration and experimentation; fabric and material selection/knowledge; construction/technical competence; ability to think/work in 3D; and visual communication.

Student selection criteria
The course seeks to recruit students from diverse socio-economic and cultural backgrounds, and welcomes applications from mature students.

What we look for
The course seeks to recruit students who can demonstrate:

a strong commitment and motivation towards a career in an aspect of the fashion industry;
an awareness and relevant experience of fashion;
appropriate knowledge and skills commensurate with planned entry into the defined course, including the ability to design, pattern cut and manufacture clothing.
English language requirements
All classes are conducted in English. The level required by the University for this course is IELTS 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each skill.

For more information, read the University’s English Language requirements link.

Home / EU fee
£9,500

This applies for the 2018/19 academic year.

UAL Home/EU alumni receive a £1,000 discount.

Course fees may be paid in instalments.

ELQ
Home/EU students whose chosen course is at a level equivalent to, or lower than, a qualification that they already hold, will be charged the fees shown above, plus an additional £1,100 (called the ‘ELQ’ fee). Students in receipt of Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) are exempt from ELQ fees and will pay the original fee, regardless of the highest qualification held. For enquiries relating to ELQ fees, please complete the course enquiry form.

International fee
£19,350

This applies for the 2018/19 academic year.

Course fees may be paid in instalments.

Additional costs
In addition to tuition fees you are very likely to incur additional costs such as travel expenses and the cost of materials. Please read the information on our additional costs link.

Masters graduates have an acknowledged advantage in the employment market, obtaining work in a wide range of vocational and academic fields related to fashion. The course provides the industry with graduates who will have the capability to work as part of a creative team as a colleague and an individual. The graduate will have transferable skills for the creative industries including an understanding of high levels of design, time and project management, production and technical knowledge of types of manufacture supported by an aesthetic awareness and academic underpinning.

The course in the past has benefited from constant contact with the industry. External assessors and tutors, leading buying and merchandising teams, stylists and photographers, journalists and editors, entrepreneurs and business consultants show an increasing interest in the emerging talent the course generates. International employers include Alberta Ferretti, Alexander McQueen, Zac Posen, Chloe, Loewe, Pringle, Hussein Chalayan, Roland Mouret, Topman, Savile Row Tailors, Browns Focus, Harvey Nichols, Topman, Savile Row Tailors and Browns Focus.

Graduates from the current MA Fashion Design and Technology have gained employment as innovators within the broad field of fashion design and technology or have identified a fashion house, large corporate company or alternatively choose to build their own identity through the launch of their own design label. Further employment of graduates has included trend prediction, stylist, illustrator, freelance designer or broad aspects of the creative industries.

Further employment opportunities include trend prediction, stylist, illustrator, freelance designer or broad aspects of the creative industries. The MA also provides an excellent preparation for higher level research degrees (MPhil or PhD), with an increasing number of graduates undertaking research in fashion related subjects.